Body dimensions
                              

Body type and body modifications  

Steel body work of unitary, 2 or 4 doors 4/5 seater. Coherent bodywork, welded in joints for a more stiffer body. Rear wheelhouse widen 2" for a better fit of the 8,5 wide wheels, this was done with the already existing plating. The plating was massaged until wanted measures. The front fenders were bent out until wanted steering ratio, and to fit the big wheel. The edges of the inner front and rear fender were cut (as image 3). Note that some car was dipped in acid to lose weight.

(Illustration: Volvo, redone by Björn Ohlson, 240grupp-A.se)
 

(Illustration: Volvo, redone Björn Ohlson, 240grupp-A.se)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: Peter Kroeber)
 

 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)

 


#VIN for ID of  a car

Almost every car have a unique Vin number for a number of reasons. But a race car really don't need a Vin number however a rally car needs a Vin number as it need to be driven at the road/highway. The Works teams however had a habit of giving their cars a Vin number, this to make it easier to separate them.

But when it comes to Volvo this thing with Vin numbers have always been a tough nut to crack, sure there have been Vin numbers but nothing consistent to go on.


For example if we talk about the 1984 cars you I have only encountered two cars (that could be confirmed with photos) that really have a Vin number for identification. Sure the series production is well known, but to identify the other cars I had to look at other things that makes a car unique like: Placing of wipers, the placing of the electric and the fire-extinguishers switches, quick release pins or placing of decals and so on. 

In 1985 Volvo started a new
series production, the series identification started with number 5 in witch was production year 1985 and then the number in production that was 01 which meant it was the first car in the series production. So the Eggeberger Volvos in 1985 was therefore 501 and 502. And an assumption that I've made is that the Magnum Racing Volvos had to be 503-504, as there is nothing to either confirm or deny this I finds it suiting that way.  

Volvo did it the same way in 1986 only that the number five was changed to the number 6 and then followed by 01, 02 and so on. And in 1986 there were a
series production starting from 601 all the way up tp 607, and the Vin number was placed on the underside of the bonnet as in the cars 605-606 (photo 7).

And some cars only had the identification plate that came with the car from the factory (photo 4).


And just to mention something about the privateer team and how they did. Often the initials of the builder of the car a part of the Vin number, but it is also often that the person code number or some other numbers that had a personal meaning could be used as a Vin number. For example Thomas Lindströms first car that he built in 1983 had the Vin number "TL001" (photo 5).

And finally there were those who punched in the Vin number onto the Chassiss directly, usual it was placed on the damper tower (photo 1).

1984 (Pic 2-3)
 
1985
 
1986 (Pic 7)
 
240A (Infra Paint)
240A 401 (TL Racing)
240A 402 (TL Racing)
240A 403 (Luna /Sportpromotion cars)
240A 404 (unknown)
240A 405 (GTM #4)
240A 406 (GTM #3)
240A 407 (spare Chassiss)
 
501 (Eggenberger #2)
502 (Eggenberger #11)
503 (Magnum Racing #8)
504 (Magnum Racing #4)
 
601 (RAS Sport #1)
602 (RAS Sport #2)
603 (Australian Volvo Dealer Team #42)
604 (Volvo Motorsport/ RAS Sport #2)
605 (Volvo Motorsport/ RAS Sport #26)
606 (Volvo Motorsport #1)
607 (Volvo Motorsport Rally car)
 
   

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: Eckart Stuhlmann)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: Patrik Werner)
 

(Photo: Rolf Öhberg)
 

 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)

 


Chassiss and livery 

Rods and struts brace (different models) for a more stiffer front suspension and body, the rods was Volvo Original parts, very common on the Volvo 242GT for example.

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives))
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 


 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)

 


Front of the car

The so called 'Flat hood' front. Thinner front bonnet and rear boot lid, aluminum was not allowed. All Group A cars 1983 to 1989 ran with the 1982 Flat bonnet, grill and surrounds being a little more aerodynamic.

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)


Boot and trunk locking pins

Boot and trunk release pins, this made it possible to check the engine quicker on the pit stops. Was normally placed in the corners of the bonnett.

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)


Head lights

Headlights molded in plastic, exactly as the originals that were in glass, this to save weight. (these headlights are not to be confused with the model made for the Canada market).


(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)


Front grill

Volvo Original 1980 GLT grill with flanges removed, just as shown on pics. Not all teams did this modification.

(Photo: Benny Augustsson)

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)


Indicator

Indicator glass, Volvo Original.





Tail light


Tail lights, Volvo Original.





Windows
 

Thinner glass replaced the original glass made from Sunex, this to save weight and the window frames on door and body had to be kept unchanged. Also the window handle on the doors and the fittings to crank up and down the windows had to stay and not be removed.

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)


Aerodynamics

The rear side windows was always precipitated to decrease the drag onto the car. And this also did the car a little bit more aerodynamic as well. Also tape was put around the headlights and grill to take away any more unwanted drag onto the front of the car.

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)


Fuel system


Fueling system with high-performance fuel pumps, it took 20 seconds to refuel. Different systems in different cars, and various locations of the refueling outtake. But the more common placing was
like the one as in the nr 1 image.

On some cars the refueling-outtakes have been placed between the rear-lights, like the Magnum team 1985, or some placed the outtake on the rear of the trunk, this was used by the Belgian GTM team in 1984 and the Mark Petch team in 1985 (this was the same car).

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: Joao Abreu)
 

  (Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)


Power and fire extinguisher switches

Fire-extinguishers system and electric break switches. Mostly mounted below the windshield on the left side. The Magnum Racing team had a other solution on this thing, they lowered the switches in the plating below the windshield, this was unique for the Magnum Volvos.
 

(Photo: Peter Kroeber)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)


Air Jacks system

Pneumatic lift system (also known as Air jacks), for use on the pit stops, and the lifts got its lifting power from compressed air. The compressed air came through a connection that was mounted below the front windshield, more common placed on the right side.

There were two models available, a smaller and a bigger version. For example it took 20 bars of pressure for the bigger on to lift the car from the tarmac so the pit people could change the wheels.

The placing of the air jacks mostly was like in photo 5 (Fundador Volvo).

 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: Olavi Hakala)
 

(Photo: Teambild.se)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 


(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

 

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)

 


Down force wing

Volvos designed down force wing in plastic, Group-A. There were six different pieces formed as the attachment of the wing. Total with 140 centimeter, 84 centimeter and 85 centimeter between the under and upper mounting. Depending how the wing was attached so the angel of the wing could be adjusted. In practice the wing was always adjusted in to maximum angel. But the wing did not arrive untill late 1983.
 

  (Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)


Body appearances (liveries)


The Swedish company Dekaltrim.nu sells Nordica War stripes, a complete sets to both Volvo 242 and 244 (just click banner to check it out)  
            




Volvo Dealers Belgium - GTM Engineering

Drivers: Pierre Dieudonné , Michel Delcourt , Jean-Marie Baert , Bernard De Dryver , Patrick Nevé and Jean-Marie Pirney with others.
 


Car #4 - Chassis: #240A 405 (Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 


Car #3 - Chassis: #240A 406 (Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)


Volvo Dealer Team Europé - Eggenberger Motorsport

Drivers: Thomas Lindström , Gianfranco Brancatelli , Siegfried Müller Jr. and Pierre Dieudonné . Carlo Rossi and Didier Theys joined up at the Spa 24 hours race in Belgium.
 

Car #11 - Chassis: #501 (Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 

Car #2 - Chassis: #502 (Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)


Volvo Dealer Team Europé - RAS Sport (Ring Auto Sport)

Drivers: Johnny Cecotto , Thomas Lindström , Ulf Granberg and Anders Olofsson . Mauro Baldi and Didier Theys joined up at the Spa 24 hours race in Belgium. Later in the season Mauro Baldi and Per- Gunnar "Peggen" Andersson joined the team in a third car.

To easy part the cars, always look at the window streamer, the decal top of the windsheild. Car #1 - #601 had a white streamer, Car #2 - #602 had a blue streamer while Car #3 - #605 had a yellow streamer. The car with chassis #606 was only a test car and a PR-stunt car, but in case needed it could function as a reserve car to.


Car #1 - Chassis: #601
(Photo: Dan Morgan)


Car #2 - Chassis: #602
(Photo: Dan Morgan)


Car #26 - Chassis: #604
(Photo: Marc Boels Photography)


Car #26 - Chassis: #605
(Photo: Luis Belo)


Car #1 - Chassis: #606
(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)


Australian Volvo Dealer Team (AVDT)

Drivers: Robbie Francevic and John Bowe . Alfredo Costanzo
, Neville Crichton and Graham Mcrae joined the team at Bathurst James Hardie 1000 and Sandow Castrol 500.

Car #10 - Chassis: #240A 405 (Photo: v8supercars.com.au)
 


Car #4 - Chassis: #603 (Photo: oldracephotos.com)
 


Car
#44 - Chassis: #2428A1168048 (Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)