Clutch

Borg & Beck or AP sinter clutch, hydraulic clutch with slave cylinder from Volvo 740.

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 
(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 
  (Photo: Antonio Rodrigues)


Flywheel


Special flywheel (VMS part no. 6808229), lighten and balanced, Group-A.




Gearbox

5-speed manual Getrag gearbox (VMS part no. 8360690) with steel sync. 1st gear down. With cooling system (cooler and radiator). Special bellhouse in magnesium so the Getrag gearbox would fit on the Volvo engine. This gearbox is not to be confused with the Volvo M-51 gearbox, that came with the Volvo 260-series, it’s not Group-A.

Gear conditions for the Getrag M51:

Gear
1 - 2.328:1.

Gear 2 - 1.675:1.

Gear
3 - 1.353:1.

Gear 4 - 1.145:1.

Gear 5 - 1.000:1.
 

 

(Photo: Thor Rustad)  
 
(Photo: Thor Rustad)  
 
(Photo: Rolf Öhberg)
 
(Photo: Torbjörn Johansson)
 
(Photo: Torbjörn Johansson)
 
(Photo: Rolf Öhberg)
 
(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)  

 
Attachements


Special gearbox attachment in aluminum, the gearbox was mounted with a special attachment between rubber bushes.

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 
(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 
 
(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)  


Propshaft
and Propshaft crossmember

Special crossmember, rebuilt to fit with Volvo 740's propshaft.

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 
(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 
 
(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)  


Rear Axle


Early cars, the first generation 1983-1984 only used Volvo 1031 steel rear axle, the best rear axle Volvo ever produced to the street version of the Volvo 240 as in pic 5.

Live axle, Axle Housing in Aluminum Alloy (VMS part no. 6807690), Dana 1031 with "bolt on" tubes (VMS part no. Right: 6808410, Left: 6808411), steel (two types - pic 3-4) with 1.5 degree negative camber + sensors for antispin system. Because of the lighter components Volvo was able to save 6 kilo compared to the rear axle in steel that was on the standard car. However this rear axle first came in 1985. There were two versions of tubes as you clearly can see on pic 3 and 4.

These 1031 rear axles were only used in ETC and not in DTM due to weight regulations, they had to use the 1031 steel axle, the regulations clearly said that the Volvos in DTM had to have a minimum weight of 1160 kilo compared to the Volvos in ETC that had a considerable lower minimum weight of 1050 kg. This was because the Volvos was to fast for the other cars in DTM. The DTM Volvos also had to have weights in form of lead bricks in the back of the car, to reach the minimum weight. 

For those who have heard that the rear axle was moved forward, this to center the wheel in the wheel arch. This is not true, as it was never done i Group-A.

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 
 (Photo: Stefan Olsson, BSR) 
 
(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 
(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)
 
 
(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)  


Differential

Limited slip diff: Dana-Spicer or ZF (Zahnrad Fabrik, Germany). Also VMS and R-Sport diff were available. Only 30% lockup to minimize under steer in low speed corners

(NOTE: This is not a group-A slip diff, only a demonstrative slip diff)




Cooling system


Oil radiator system for the rear axle (radiator with pump). There were two different placing of the radiators, one where the cooler was placed under the floor of the car and and on where the radiator was placed on the back of the safety tank, this was mad by the RAS team in 1986 to get a better weight distribution.

(Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives) (Photo: 240grupp-A.se Archives)


Note regarding the VMS-1031 with aluminum alloy housing with bolted tubes were only a product from the Volvo Motorsport department, and nothing that came with the cars that Volvo sold to the public for street use. Also these rear axles were only produced in a small number.

But there were a 1030 rear axle with a similar look like the VMS-1031 that came with cars produced for the public, HOWEVER these axles are not to be compared since they only share the "look" in apperance, they are not the one and same.